Archive for the Sculpture Category

Art lesson 101

Posted in Alberto Replanski, Apprentice, Art, Artists, Sculpture, Story, The Path with tags , on April 22, 2010 by Erikakw

Alberto said that people talk without saying much. As I perused twitter last night, it seemed so. Sometimes I wish we lived in a world where there were more pictures and less words.

Words produce noise, noise gets in the way of seeing and hearing. Many days I only want to meet with silence.

Alberto listened to people, he listened to empty talk and words that seemed full of promise. It was best to wait and see what words would reveal of a person, whether they were interested in art, the value of it, interested in what he was saying in his work.

To the individual artist what matters is; that people give us a chance to speak through our art. When we give time to listen we are demonstrating our interest and intention. When we demonstrate our interest and intention we are giving importance to a person’s story thereby acknowledging that there is value and meaning to their existence.

Deconstructed boat

Posted in 21st century, Alberto Replanski, Art, Artists, Industry, Sculpture, Steveston, Story, The Fraser River, Trade with tags , , , , , , , , on December 30, 2009 by Erikakw

Imashing

Posted in 21st century, Alchemy, Apprentice, Art, Artists, Chronos, Dance, Kairos, Living, quotidian, Sculpture, Steveston, Story, The Path, Wild Flower with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 8, 2009 by Erikakw

“Me…. I live for imagination in my dreaming. I’m looking to re-generate my imagination to use it for Good for people, for community, for telling stories, because I have to.  Mixing and matching and mashing, collaging my way to the end, that’s my thing. That’s re-generation how the rest happens is mystery–Rhea Phoenix for salonunidad

‘Olas de vienta’

Posted in 21st century, Fisher folk, Japanese, Sculpture, Steveston, The Fraser River, The Wind, Trade with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2009 by Erikakw

Domenge’s carbon steel sphere is as unique as its negative spaces, which create dramatic view corridors to where the Fraser River meets the ocean.

“The place itself, it had to be something that reminds you of the waves of the sea, the waves of the wind and the waves of the intensity of life,” she says in an telephone interview from a Vancouver hotel.

—Matthew Hoekstra, Richmond Review, sculpture at Garry Point

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